pumpkindoom:

SURPRISE

I AM CUTE BUG

thenewenlightenmentage:

Meet Creatonotos gangis, the weirdest moth you’ve ever seen. This is a male, and the strange structures you can see are called corematas. They’re used to spread large amounts of pheromones which attract females. The size of these scent organs are dependent on the diet that the moth experienced as a caterpillar.
Image Credit: Juan Manuel

thenewenlightenmentage:

Meet Creatonotos gangis, the weirdest moth you’ve ever seen. This is a male, and the strange structures you can see are called corematas. They’re used to spread large amounts of pheromones which attract females. The size of these scent organs are dependent on the diet that the moth experienced as a caterpillar.

Image Credit: Juan Manuel

(Source: facebook.com)

sinobug:

Picture-winged Leaf Moth (Camptochilus sp., Thyrididae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

sinobug:

Limacodidae - The Next Generation  by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr. Pu’er, Yunnan, China  View my other images of Limacodid Caterpillars from China (Beijing and Yunnan) in the set, Limacodid (Cup Moth) Caterpillars. View the best of other Flickr members images of Limacodid Caterpillars in the gallery, Nettle/Slug Caterpillars of the Limacodidae (Cup Moths) See previous posts on SINOBUG featuring these magnificent caterpillars HERE.

sinobug:

Limacodidae - The Next Generation

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

View my other images of Limacodid Caterpillars from China (Beijing and Yunnan) in the set, Limacodid (Cup Moth) Caterpillars.
View the best of other Flickr members images of Limacodid Caterpillars in the gallery, Nettle/Slug Caterpillars of the Limacodidae (Cup Moths)

See previous posts on SINOBUG featuring these magnificent caterpillars HERE.

(Source: asiwaswalkingallalone)

insectlove:

awkwardbuggirl: If you don’t think this is cute, you’re wrong.

insectlove:

awkwardbuggirlIf you don’t think this is cute, you’re wrong.

rhamphotheca:

Tiger Moth (Pachydota nervosa), family Erebidae, Ecuador

(photos: Andreas Kay)

sinobug:

Fruit-sucking (or Fruit-piercing) Moth (Eudocima tyrannus, Catocalinae, Noctuidae)

Many moths of this genus are agricultural pests, causing damage to any sort of fruit by piercing it with its strong proboscis in order to suck the juice. The moth feeds at night, and attacks unripe as well as ripe fruit. The hole pierced by the moth allows the entry of fungi and other agents which then cause the fruit to rot prematurely.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

sinobug:

Crambid Moth (Dichocrocis zebralis, Spilomelinae, Crambidae)  by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr. Pu’er, Yunnan, China  See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

sinobug:

Crambid Moth (Dichocrocis zebralis, Spilomelinae, Crambidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

hongkongnaturewalk:

Head shots for an Emerald Moth: Pelagodes antiquadraria, male.

Wingspan ~34mm

[Geometridae, Geometrinae]

17 Jun 2013, HK Island east.

sinobug:

How Many Eyes Does a Caterpillar Have?

Caterpillars have six pairs of simple eyes (ocelli). Ocelli (also called stemmata) are small, simple eyes that can detect changes in light intensity, but cannot form an image so you will see caterpillars swaying their heads from side-to-side to differentiate objects before them. These eyes are usually located in two clusters of six eyes on the sides of a larva’s head. Occasionally, one of these may be offset from the rest as in the case of this large Lasiocampid moth caterpillar - five ocelli form a semicircle (top image) while the sixth is located beneath this cluster next to the antennae (visible in the bottom image).

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese caterpillars on my Flickr site HERE…..

archiemcphee:

It’s time to pay a visit to the Department of Awesome Mimicry where we’ll meet the Lygodium Spider Moth (Siamusotima aranea). Discovered in Thailand in 2005, this clever creature evolved markings on its wings that give it the impressively convincing appearance of being a spindly, orange spider. The markings deter predators and, now that it’s been discovered by humans, probably many arachnophobes as well.

Photos by John Horstman

[via Geekologie]

sinobug:

Lappet Moth, female (Trabala viridana, Lasiocampidae)   by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr. Pu’er, Yunnan, China  See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

sinobug:

Lappet Moth, female (Trabala viridana, Lasiocampidae)

Lappet Moth, female (Trabala viridana, Lasiocampidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

fyeahcutemoths:

oomizuao:

All those stuffed moths are made by Gauriojisan.(It means Mr.moth seller in Japanese.) 
So fuzzy + fluffy + cute.

More adorable moth plushes!

sinobug:

Stinging Nettle Slug Caterpillar (Cup Moth, Mahanta sp., Limacodidae)
Mid-instar (above) and late instar (below)……

Cup Moths (Limacodidae) are remarkable not only for their startling larvae but for their pupae as well, from which they derive their name. The final instar caterpillars construct a cup-shaped silk cocoon and harden it with calcium oxalate. Cocoons have a circular escape hatch, formed from a line of weakness in the silk matrix. It is forced open by the pupa just prior to emergence of the adult.

This is the adult moth of this caterpillar (Mahanta sp.)…..

Pu’er, Yunnan, China
View my other images of Limacodid Caterpillars from China (Beijing and Yunnan) in the set, Limacodid (Cup Moth) Caterpillars. View the best of other Flickr members images of Limacodid Caterpillars in the gallery, Nettle/Slug Caterpillars of the Limacodidae (Cup Moths).

sinobug:

Stinging Nettle Slug Caterpillar (Cup Moth, Mahanta sp., Limacodidae)

Mid-instar (above) and late instar (below)……

Stinging Nettle Cup Moth Caterpillar (Mahanta sp., Limacodidae)

Cup Moths (Limacodidae) are remarkable not only for their startling larvae but for their pupae as well, from which they derive their name. The final instar caterpillars construct a cup-shaped silk cocoon and harden it with calcium oxalate. Cocoons have a circular escape hatch, formed from a line of weakness in the silk matrix. It is forced open by the pupa just prior to emergence of the adult.

Empty Cup Moth Pupal Case

This is the adult moth of this caterpillar (Mahanta sp.)…..

Cup Moth (Mahanta sp., Limacodidae)

Pu’er, Yunnan, China

View my other images of Limacodid Caterpillars from China (Beijing and Yunnan) in the set, Limacodid (Cup Moth) Caterpillars.
View the best of other Flickr members images of Limacodid Caterpillars in the gallery, Nettle/Slug Caterpillars of the Limacodidae (Cup Moths).